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bowels

Now you can have your cake and eat it too!
by Dr. Maitreyi Raman, Angela Sirounis, Jennifer Shrubsole
Now you can have your cake and eat it too!
Recipes and tips to manage IBS

Approximately 15-20 percent of the population is affected by the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and it is among the top five reasons why patients seek attention from health-care providers.

Living with IBS can be a tremendous challenge, and understanding the disease is the key to developing effective management strategies. The authors of The Complete IBS Health & Diet Guide provide current and concise information on the possible underlying causes, symptoms, clinical features, effective treatments and therapies, including both complementary and non-drug therapies.

DR. MAITREYI RAMAN, MD, MSc, FRCPC, is the Medical Director, Southern Alberta Nutrition Support Services, at the University of Calgary Medical Clinic. ANGELA SIROUNIS, BSc, RD, is a clinical dietician with Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary. JENNIFER SHRUBSOLE, BSc, RD, is a clinical dietician with Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary.

Though there is no cure for IBS, many options are available to treat the symptoms. One of the most recommended therapies is diet, because symptoms can actually worsen after you eat certain foods. Therefore, a specific diet is imperative for those managing IBS, and dietary changes can reduce symptoms for many people. The authors of the IBS guide provide a detailed approach to a nutritional plan and suggestions for implementing that plan, as well as information on vitamin and mineral supplements. Also included in the book are lists of foods that are known to aggravate IBS and foods that experts consider to be safe alternatives. Over 100 delicious recipes, with accompanying nutritional analyses, have been specially created for those managing IBS — everything from breakfasts and snacks to main meal options, including vegetarian and vegan selections. With the reliable information on IBS and meal plans you’ll find in this book, you’ll learn to manage the condition and regain your sense of well-being.

Twelve tips for managing IBS

Though there is no cure for IBS, many options are available to treat the symptoms. One of the most recommended therapies is diet, because symptoms can actually worsen after you eat certain foods.
  1. Eat small meals at regular times throughout the day to promote bowel regularity. Aim for six small meals as opposed to three big ones. Each meal should have an appropriate balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
  2. Don’t let you get too hungry or eat too much. Being either too full or too hungry will worsen your symptoms.
  3. Don’t eat FOODMAP foods - or, at the least, limit their intake. These foods include dairy products and wheat products.
  4. Drink adequate amounts of liquids, particularly water, but don’t drink carbonated beverages, including soda pop and sparkling water. Inadequate water ingestion can predispose you to constipation and aggravate abdominal bloating and cramping.
  5. Avoid caffeine - or, at the least, curtail intake to no more than two cups a day. Coffee, colas, and other caffeinated products predispose you to dehydration, which compounds bloating and cramping.
  6. Avoid fast foods and high-fat foods, such as French fries, potato chips, and other salty snacks.
  7. Don’t eat late at night. Your last meal or snack should be more than three hours before bedtime.
  8. Wear loose clothing if symptoms of pain or cramping persist.
  9. Consider using stress-reducing strategies, such as psychological counseling, meditation, and yoga.
  10. Exercise thirty to forty-five minutes three to four times a week at a vigorous pace, if health permits.
  11. Use IBS and pain-management medications as prescribed by your doctor. Do not start any medication without first consulting your doctor, even over-the-counter and non-prescription medications.
  12. See your health-care provider if any red flag symptoms arise, such as blood in your stool, black tarry stools, abdominal pain, unexpected weight loss, and persistent diarrhea.
A cake you can eat if you have IBS
Flourless Chocolate Cake
Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C)
9-inch (23 cm) springform pan, bottom lined with parchment paper and bottom and sides lightly greased

Ingredients 1 cup unsalted butter, cubed (250 mL)
8 oz. gluten-free bittersweet (dark) (250 g chocolate chips)
1 cup granulated sugar (250 mL)
6 eggs, at room temperature
1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder (250 mL)
Confectioners’ (icing) sugar

  1. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, stir together butter and chocolate chips, ensuring chocolate doesn’t burn, until just melted and blended.
  2. Transfer chocolate mixture to a bowl. Using a wooden spoon, beat in sugar. One at a time, beat in eggs, mixing well after each addition. Sift in cocoa powder and stir until just blended. Pour into prepared pan.
  3. Bake in center of preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until cake has risen, has a thin crust and center is firm.
  4. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in pan for 10 minutes. Invert onto a platter. Remove pan sides and parchment paper. Let cool completely, then sift confectioners’ sugar over top.
Makes 16 servings
No flour needed!

Nutrients per serving Calories 231
Carbohydrates 23 g
Sugars 18 g
Fructose trace
Glucose trace
Protein 4 g
Fat 17 g
Saturated Fat 10 g
Cholesterol 100 mg
Total Fiber 2 g
Calcium 41 mg
Iron 2 mg
Sodium 26 mg
Vitamin A 120 RAE
Vitamin C trace

Low FOODMAP Content
Gluten-Free
Low Lactose
Vegetarian


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