Home Care For You



Home
Our Experts
About Us
Advertise

ContactHome Care For YOU Home


 MEDICAL

addictions

allergies

alternative medic ...

bones and joints

bowels

cancer

chiropractic

circulatory

diabetes

ears

endocrine

eyes

feet

gynecology

head

heart

infectious diseas ...

injuries

kidneys

mens health

mental

muscles

neurology

nutrition

patient rights

pharmacy

physical therapy

respiratory

senior care

skin

sleep disorders

stomach

technology

teeth

virus

 LIFESTYLE

celebrities

financial health

pet relationships

physical fitness

plant therapy

recipes

travel

meet the authors


Bookmark and Share
pharmacy

Ask The Pharmacist
I have heard that I should avoid grapefruit juice because of some of the medications that I take. Why?

Grapefruit There are chemicals in grapefruit juice that prevent the breakdown of certain drugs in your digestive system by interfering with digestive enzymes. This allows more of the medication to reach the bloodstream which, in turn, results in higher drug levels. The higher drug levels may cause an increased (or toxic) clinical effect and/or increased side effects.

The chemicals are found in the pulp and peel of grapefruit. Therefore, any grapefruit product – sections, pieces, juice and dietary supplements that contain grapefruit extracts -- should be avoided and avoided completely. This means that no grapefruit consumption, regardless of time of day, should occur. Although not yet studied, some literature also suggests that other citrus fruits like pummelos and tangelos, which are genetically derived from grapefruit, have the same interaction ability.

The good news is: not all medications in a therapeutic class are affected. This means that, usually, an alternative medication may be prescribed if you just cannot give up your grapefruit juice! You should consult your pharmacist or doctor if you have any questions regarding drug interactions.

The following drugs are known to have potentially serious interactions with grapefruit products:
Amiodorone
Atorvastatin
Buspirone
Carbamazepine
Cisapride
Diazepam
Felodipine
Lovastatin
Nicardipine
Nisoldipine
Pimozide
Simvastatin
Sirolimus
Triazolam
Ziprasidone
(Cordarone, Pacerone)
(Lipitor)
(Buspar)
(Tegretol, Tegretol XR)
(Propulsid)
(Diastat, Valium)
(Plendil)
(Altocor, Altoprev, Mevacor)
(Cardene)
(Sular)
(Orap)
(Zocor, Vytorin)
(Rapamune)
(Halcion)
(Geodon)


printer friendly page  · 




"Ask The Pharmacist"
   authored by:
PHARMACY
Tamara Dulin, R.Ph., is a registered pharmacist with Nightingale Home Health Care in Carmel, Indiana. A 1991 graduate of Butler University College of Pharmacy, she has spent the majority of her career in consulting. She is a past president of the Ind...



Prevention for shing...

Leaves of three...le...

Proper use of inhale...

Teaming herbals with...

A fungus among us......

Is your medication o...

Sore throat season i...

Laxative choice shou...

There’s no x in Rx

Another summer of cl...

Treating GERD

FDA examines...Tylen...

Nasal Wash: An alter...

There is more to kno...

Watch out for the to...

Solving the Generic ...

From the Pharmacy .....

It’s Poison Ivy Seas...

Drug Disposal

Are you protected?

Chickenpox virus is ...

For Best Results TIM...

Best defense for all...

Side effects of Anti...

Where are the OTC co...

Ask The Pharmacist