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circulatory

Abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures are more common in women than men
by Eva Rzucidlo, MD
Abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures are more common in women than men Each year more than 200,000 Americans get an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 15,000 (75 to 90 percent) die from one. More men than women comprise the five to seven percent of adults who are sixty years of age or older who have an AAA; however two to three percent of women who have an AAA have four times the risk of rupture. The abdominal aorta (the largest artery in the abdomen) supplies blood to the lower part of the body. In the abdomen, just below the navel, the aorta splits into two branches, called the iliac arteries, which carry blood into each leg. As blood flows through the abdominal aorta, it can push and expand the artery wall causing it to weaken, enlarge, and bulge out, creating an AAA.
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Simple activities to keep your blood flowing
Simple activities to keep your blood flowing

“Welcome summer as your time to become physically fit and keep your vascular system healthy,” said Anil Hingorani, MD, a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery®. “Summertime activities burn calories, increase your heart rate, and keep your blood flowing at a healthy rate.”
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Are You at Risk?
by Geno J. Merli, M.D., F.A.C.P.
Are You at Risk? 300,000 will die this year from a little known disease.

Each year, millions of Americans are affected by a potentially life-threatening condition, yet most aren’t aware of the signs, symptoms, or risk factors for developing it.

The condition is deep-vein thrombosis, commonly referred to as DVT, and as many as two million Americans suffer from DVT annually, and approximately 300,000 die each year from a related complication called pulmonary embolism, also known as PE. In fact, complications from DVT kill more Americans than breast cancer and AIDS combined.
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Avoiding DVT
by Michael Southworth, MD
DVT, Radius Magazine On long plane rides walk the aisles every half hour or forty-five minutes

There are few things I enjoy in medicine as much as breaking down the workings of the human body and disease states that plague it into a language a patient or family can use to make good decisions regarding their health. In medicine, knowledge is power.

One such disease is deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We have heard a lot more recently about this problem because of its occurrence in long distance air travelers. The concept is this: The arteries bring the blood to your feet from the heart. They do so at a very high pressure generated by the heart (a pump) and maintained by very elastic arterial walls.
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